Government Approves 1,387 Unbudgeted Temporary Positions, Sparks Concerns Over Meritocracy

Government Approves 1,387 Unbudgeted Temporary Positions, Sparks Concerns Over Meritocracy

Critics Challenge Annual Creation of Temporary Posts, Former Officials Call for Systematic Manpower Planning

The government has approved 1,387 temporary positions outside the budget in the first four months of the financial year. These positions, spanning various ministries, include officer-level roles and have been sanctioned in multiple Cabinet meetings. Critics argue that the annual creation of temporary posts, allowing ministers to appoint their connections, undermines the merit system. Former officials emphasize that such practices are irregular, calling for a systematic approach to projecting manpower needs to uphold meritocracy.

The government has authorized the creation of 1,387 temporary positions outside the budget in the first four months of the current financial year. These positions, spanning various levels, services, groups, and sub-groups of gazetted categories, were approved for different projects and programs across various ministries from July 2080. Notably, a significant number of officer-level positions were sanctioned. The Cabinet meetings, on proposals from respective ministries, approved these temporary positions on different dates.

Specifically, 19 temporary posts were approved in July, 920 in August for eight ministries, 187 in October for three ministries, and 261 in November. This practice of yearly approval of permanent posts by ministers, favouring their own connections, has been detrimental to the merit system. There is a growing trend to appoint their own candidates, bypassing Public Service Commission examinations.

Temporary officer-level positions were sanctioned in various ministries. For instance, the Council of Ministers meeting on July 30, 2080, approved 19 gazetted posts for the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock. These positions were intended for the Nepal Livestock Sector Innovation Project and decentralized project support units.

In August, the Council of Ministers meeting approved 38 temporary gazetted posts for the Ministry of Forests and Environment, focusing on projects like integrated land perimeter management. Similarly, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology approved 74 temporary gazetted posts for the Medical Education Commission and other educational agencies.

The Ministry of Urban Development received approval for 469 temporary gazetted posts in new city projects and other agencies. Other ministries, such as Land Management, Cooperatives and Poverty Alleviation, Water Supply, Culture, Tourism and Civil Aviation, Communication and Information Technology, and Home Affairs, also obtained approvals for temporary positions at different levels.

In October, the Ministry of Health and Population secured approval for 172 temporary posts at the authorized level, and the Ministry of Federal Affairs and General Administration received approval for six authorized level positions. Additionally, an Information Technology Officer post was created in the Attorney General’s Office, and the Ministry of Physical Infrastructure and Transport secured approval for 14 temporary posts.

The Cabinet meeting on November 16, 2080, approved 261 gazetted posts for the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock Development.

Concerns have been raised by former Public Service Commission Chairman Umesh Mainali, who highlights that around 20 to 22 thousand employees are currently working on temporary posts, criticizing the government’s practice of creating temporary positions every year. Similarly, former Chief Secretary Bimal Koirala and administration expert Kashiraj Dahal assert that creating temporary posts should only occur in emergency situations and is otherwise irregular and against the constitution.

These experts emphasize the need for a systematic approach to project manpower requirements for the next 50 years to avoid such irregularities and uphold meritocracy.


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